Pluralsight Course is out!

My Pluralsight course, Identifying Existing Products, Services, and Technologies in Use for Microsoft Azure, is out an available here. Check it out, here is the short and long descriptions:

Short description:
Microsoft Azure can host almost any application, but understanding how to use it with existing workflows is a must. In this course, you will learn how to integrate existing workflows, technologies, and processes with Microsoft Azure.
 
Long description:
Knowing how to integrate Microsoft Azure with an existing app’s workflow is essential to using Azure to host that application. In this course, Identifying Existing Products, Services, and Technologies in Use for Microsoft Azure, you will learn foundational knowledge of and gain the ability to navigate the Microsoft Azure documentation and utilize the tools for Microsoft Azure. First, you will discover how to navigate through the Microsoft Azure documentation. Next, you will learn how to utilize the different guides and tutorials of the Microsoft Azure products. Finally, you will explore how to work with Microsoft Azure using your existing tools and workflows. When you are finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge of Microsoft Azure tools and documentation needed to use the products, services, and technologies provided. 

South Florida Code Camp – Azure IoT Overview

March 2nd 2019, I will be presenting Azure IoT Overview at the South Florida Code Camp in Davie, FL. You can register here – and its FREE. Here is the synopsis of the presentation:

Abstract

Keeping up to date on all the new services and features for an entire cloud portfolio could be a full-time job. In this presentation, we will look at the state of IoT in Microsoft Azure and discuss how the different services work together to implement an enterprise solution. Use this presentation to get an overview of architecture and products so that the next time you are presented with an IoT problem in Azure you know the solution.

 

 

CodeMash 2019 – Alternative Device Interfaces and Machine Learning

I was once again accepted to speak at CodeMash. This year I will be presenting – Alternative Device Interfaces and Machine Learning. If you would like to purchase tickets, they are for sell. Here is what is going to be covered:

Alternative Device Interfaces and Machine Learning

In this presentation, we will look at the how users interface with machines without the use of touch. These different types of interaction have their benefits and pitfalls. To showcase the power of these user interactions we will explore: Voice commands with mobile applications, Speech Recognition, and Computer Vision. After this presentation, attendees will have the knowledge to create applications that can utilize voice, video, and machine learning.

Authoring for Pluralsight

Coming soon I will be authoring a course for Pluralsight titled – “Identify Existing Products, Services and Technologies in Use For Microsoft Azure” . This course targets software developers who are looking to get started with Microsoft Azure services to build modern cloud-enabled solutions and want to further extend their knowledge of those services by learning how to use existing products, services, and technologies offered by Microsoft Azure.

Microsoft Azure is a host for almost any application, but determining how to use it within existing workflows is paramount for success. In this course, Identify Existing Products, Services and Technologies in Use, you will learn how to integrate existing workflows, technologies, and processes with Microsoft Azure.

We explore Microsoft Azure with the following technologies:

  • Languages, Frameworks, and IDEs –
    • IntelliJ IDEA
    • WebStorm
    • Visual Studio Code
    • .NET Core
    • C#
    • Java
    • JavaScript
    • Spring
    • NodeJS
    • Docker
  • Microsoft Azure Products
    • Azure App Services
    • Azure Kubernetes
    • Azure Functions
    • Azure IoT Hub

Hopefully we can take a developer familiar with the languages, frameworks, and ides available and make have them up and running on Microsoft Azure after this short course.

Generate Protocol Buffers on build with CMake

Just to see if it was possible on my current project, I tried to generate C++ code files from their .proto definitions whenever CMake ran. To do this, I added a few lines to the CMakeLists.txt file of the project. The idea is to use execute_process to call protoc and generate the files in the appropriate folder in the solution.

First, file(GLOB …) is used to set all of the .proto files into an iterable variable. Then, variables are setup for the proto_path and cpp_out variables.

After that, the files variable is looped and for each of the files we use execute_process to invoke protoc and generate the .pb.h and .pb.cc files.

Finally, we want to add the .pb.h and .pb.cc files to a variable for the final build. To do so, use file(GLOB …) again to search for all appropriate files.

 

Using Angular Kendo Grid with Elastic Search and ASP.NET Core

There was a need for using a Kendo Grid in an Angular 5 website where the backing store for the data was Elastic Search. Utilizing the filtering on local data was simple enough but for the needs of filtering there needed to be server side integration. The server was running ASP.NET Core.

To get started create a view and view model for Angular to expose the grid.

To wire the view and view model to the server side data, there needs to be an Angular HTTP service and an ASP.NET Core Controller. The controller needs to be able to accept the filter and paging options of the grid as the user changes them and react to them server side. To accomplish this, some objects need to be created to handle the request:

First, the filter object, which is changed whenever a new filter is selected or is cleared; must be mapped to a C# object that can be serialized. The structure of the Kendo Grid filter is as such:

filter: {
      logic: 'and',
      filters: [{ field: 'ProductName', operator: 'contains', value: 'Chef' }]
}

To make that object transportable to C#, lets create a POCO:

Now lets create an ASP.NET Core controller endpoint for our Filter.

The only thing missing now is the query to work is the CompositeFilterMapper.

You will need to build in your own express and type mapping for properties, but otherwise this is built for Strings and DateTimes. From this base you should be able to implement different types and queries you would need for the Kendo Grid to work with ElasticSearch.